Larry Alexander, OD FAAO (1947 - 2016)

larry2

My heart is broken hearing of Larry's passing. Anyone who knew Larry was a better person for it. Last week Larry asked me to remove EyeLessons in its entirety so I reluctantly took it down. He also told me I could do with it whatever I want with it, so I'm putting it back up so others can enjoy Larry's style of education for a little longer.  EyeLessons was a labor of love, and I was constantly amazed at the content output by one of Optometry's leading educators.

Larry, I will miss you. It was an honor working with you and calling you a friend.

-Adam Parker, OD
(the guy behind the scenes of EyeLessons)

posted April 18, 2016

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Is There a Significant Relationship of Smoking and Obesity to Glaucoma

Is There a Significant Relationship of Smoking and Obesity to Glaucoma
Every once in a while you just have to step back and take a 30,000-foot view of things. When you read the following studies regarding proof of the risk of smoking on the worsening of glaucoma, you really need to put it in perspective. If you concede that vascular perfusion is a significant part of virtually every eye disease, you know that perfusion equates to the provision of oxygen to tissue. If you look at the lungs in the above photo, you pretty much have to figure that there is some cause and effect relationship between smoking and lack of oxygen to the eye. But let’s look at the studies.

Beyond the Bucks

Eye Care’s Opportunity in Health Care Reform

Beyond the Bucks

This paper was originally published in November 2010 and several times since, under different titles and for focused audiences. Why another re-write? As you would expect, time has passed and events needed to be updated. The more important reason, however, is you. This time around, the audience is you, eye care providers from all corners of the profession. There is another important change as well. Formerly, my colleague and I wrote from a position of vendor bias. Coming now from Eye Care Advice, this reiteration of the message comes without vendor bias. I remain indebted to my colleague, James E. Grue, O.D. for his unparalleled insight into health care reform. Together, we wish you every success as you continue to dig deep to understand the changes you must make in order to thrive in the new era of value-driven health care we call “reform”.