Articles in Category: Philosophy/Editorials

What To Do About Health Care Reform

What To Do About Health Care Reform

If you as a practitioner take the time to read The Directed Eye Exam, the downloadable eBook The Roadmap to Inclusion and the downloadable eBook Medicare Pay-for Performance & Value Driven Health Care you should start being concerned about your ability to participate in the new healthcare game. Herein, we have developed a roadmap or checklist to facilitate your thought process on developing a strategy and facilitating this strategy. Links have been included for your convenience to enable you to develop a sense of what this is all about. Use this checklist to move forward on what needs to be done to enable you to move through this bureaucratic forest to retool your practice.

Tuesday, 07 May 2013 Written by Larry J Alexander OD FAAO, Alistair Jackson, M. Ed. Posted in Philosophy/Editorials

Eye Doctors Are Stranded On A Sandbar Dictated By Our Examination Paradigm

Eye Doctors Are Stranded On A Sandbar Dictated By Our Examination Paradigm

When I started in Optometry in 1971 we were stranded on a sandbar. It was either the 21-point examination or the graphical analysis method. We tested and tried to put the results into some variation of an equation to come up with an answer for the patient. When we were learning the examination techniques, it seemed sort of silly and it really did not transfer well to my first position as a Navy optometrist. Then we evolved further to develop the problem-based examination that didn’t ever really catch on. We really never left the sandbar with problem-based and we continue to be stranded.

Wednesday, 03 April 2013 Written by Larry J Alexander OD FAAO Posted in Philosophy/Editorials

So You Think Checking For Plaquenil Toxicity Will Not Make A Difference?

A STORY THAT NEEDS TO BE TOLD

So You Think Checking For Plaquenil Toxicity Will Not Make A Difference?

Recently new guidelines for the management of patients taking PLAQUENIL were released. Two of the authors of this article published in this area, being the first to point to the importance of assessing kidney and liver function in all patients scheduled to be placed on PLAQUENIL.

Wednesday, 20 February 2013 Written by Larry J Alexander OD FAAO, Kim Sneed, LPN, CNC, Dwayne Yeager BSRT, OD, FAAO Posted in Philosophy/Editorials

It’s kind of like…

The art of patient communication

It’s kind of like…

It is much easier to capture and retain a patients’ attention if they present with a corneal foreign body than it is to have the same patient listen to you explain the significance of their newly diagnosed – or ongoing – glaucoma. The range of significance of the various glaucoma conversations can be as seemingly benign as discussing the significance of a positive family history to as attention-grabbing as managing a case of painful, acute angle closure. Most of our glaucoma patients reside somewhere between these two extremes. The typically painless and frequently unremarkable presenting and ongoing symptoms associated with most glaucoma patients sometimes makes it difficult to convey the significance of this silent thief of sight. Poor patient comprehension partially linked to inefficient patient education contributes to the staggeringly poor compliance rates of glaucoma patients.

Vitamins may reduce likelihood of ARMD and Dry Eye, or the Patient May Aspirate and Die

... so make sure you read this

Vitamins may reduce likelihood of ARMD and Dry Eye, or the Patient May Aspirate and Die

As a doctor, we recommend nutritional supplements for a number of reasons. Among those are dry eye and macular degeneration. In both cases the patients often have dry mouths as well. When you have a dry mouth, it is harder to swallow things. When you have trouble swallowing the worst thing that you can do is put a large chunk of something in your mouth that is inherently a bit sticky or very dry and try to swallow it. Enter the Omega 3 1000 mg soft gel or any other vitamin supplement or pill. So which one of these in the picture is most likely to get “stuck?”